Workshops 2019

During ISCOMS, it is possible to participate in different kinds of workshops. You can actively participate in various hands-on workshop, but it is also possible to choose for a more informative workshop, for example an interactive lecture.

The following workshops will be organised during ISCOMS 2019.

Tuesday June  4th

Basic life support: Heroes aren’t born, they are trained

Department: Wenckebach Training Institute, UMCG

Supervisor: Wim J.C. Grimberg, Docent-Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor,

Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Crime scene or no crime scene?

Department: Community Health Service (GGD) Groningen

Supervisors: Taco van Mesdag and Tatjana Naujocks, both MD forensic medicine

Finding a dead person requires further investigation. In the first place it is necessary to be sure a person is dead indeed and in the second place it is important to find out whether a person died from natural causes or not. Last but not least, declaring a person dead and signing the death certificate requires certainty about the identity of the person you want to declare dead. Making mistakes in these situations creates a lot of problems for the ‘living-dead’ person.

During this workshop we will present two crime scene investigations, not the ones you can see on TV, but the ones we see in real life!

Questions like: what happened here, when, why and to whom did it happen, will have to be answered and the students will have the opportunity to participate.

Real forensic investigators will be present to join us in the investigations. The bodies – of course – won’t be real, but will be represented by two LOTUS-volunteers. LOTUS is an organization that participates in all kinds of training where casualties/victims are needed, dead or alive. They do a perfect job by playing their roles lifelike, or in our cases dead like.

Guided tour in the central animal facility of the UMCG

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Catriene Thuring, DVM, PhD, Annemieke van Oosten, PhD

Many major findings in the field of human medicine have been established
following animal experiments. To date, animal experimentation is still a
very important way to gain data and knowledge mandatory to develop new
procedures in modern human medicine.

Within the UMCG all animal experimental work is organised in the Central Animal Facility.
The workshop consists of a guided tour in this facility. During the tour the current status of laboratory animal experimentation within the UMCG will be presented to you.

Please note:

For permission to participate in the tour it is important that you have not had contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the tour. In this way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Lab on a chip

Department:  Research Institute of Pharmacy

Supervisor:    Drs. Ing. P.P.M.F.A (Patty) Mulder, Prof. E.M.J. (Sabeth) Verpoorte, PhD

Over the past couple of decades Lab-on-a-chip technologies made inroads into laboratories focusing on the development of fast chemical and bioanalytical analyses using minute volumes of sample. Micro- and nanotechnologies are used to construct interconnected microchannel networks in planar substrates, forming microfluidic devices to replace more conventional chemical vessels such as beakers, and columns to achieve ultra-small-volume (10-6 to 10-15 µL) liquid handling. Small handheld analysers are one result, suitable for medical diagnostic, agricultural, environmental, and other applications.

The last fifteen years, lab chip technologies have also found increasing application for cell biological studies, as cell microenvironments can be exquisitely engineered to mimic in vivo environments. It becomes possible to think about assembling tissue constructs or actual tissue samples in physiological configurations in specially designed lab chip systems, so-called “body-on-a-chip” or “human-on-a-chip” system. This may lead to an improved capability to study in vivo processes in vitro. Organ interactions can be revealed in these systems, giving insight not only into drug toxicity but also into more subtle regulatory pathways between organs.

This workshop will give a short glimpse into how a laboratory is actively involved in the realisation of lab chip systems for sensing/analytical chemistry and cell culture and analysis. Participants will see the fabrication of those devices and the basic principles of microfluidics. Besides that, they have an opportunity to discuss about other possible medical uses of the lab-on-a-chip technologies with researchers in the lab.

Inside the psychotic experience (conversation with a patient)

Department: Psychiatry, UMCG

Supervisor: Frank D. van Es MD

Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as loss of contact with reality. Patients experiencing psychosis may report hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) or delusional beliefs (false beliefs about what is taking place or who one is). The combination of both can cause an often severe disruption to perception, thinking, emotion, and behaviour. Depending on its severity, a psychotic episode may thus be accompanied by unusual or bizarre behaviour, as well as difficulty with social interaction and, impairment in carrying out daily life activities. As a result, patients with psychosis are caught in a hostile environment. They are therefore in need of your dedication and medical skills: how can you meet their needs? How can you avoid stigma and promote health and social recovery?

During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a psychiatrist and a patient who has suffered from psychosis.

An introduction in treating life-threatening situations in the ICU

Department: Department of Critical Care, UMCG

Supervisor: J.C.C. van der Horst, MD PhD, Dinald Maatman, Nursing Staff

Implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the ICU to provide care in often life-threatening situations, focused attention on the relevance of leadership behaviour. Effective, coordinated, and safe patient care challenge even the most experienced ICU teams daily. Leadership behaviour is defined as the process of influencing others to understand and agree about what needs to be done and how to do it, and facilitating individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared objectives. Simulation training is useful for teaching team-based crisis management skills and is now considered essential in developing and maintaining competencies for ICU workers.

In our high fidelity simulation center, participants of the workshop will become familiar with some stepwise elements of the treatment, such as resuscitation and airway management of critically ill patients. The non-technical skills such as leadership, communication, and cooperation are also emphasised. The experiences may contribute to the development of knowledge and skills in decision-making and teamwork during the treatment of critically ill patients.

Practical Ultrasound

Department: Medical Imaging Centre (MIC), UMCG

Supervisor: Theo Kok MD PhD

Medical ultrasonography (sonography or ultrasound) is a diagnostic imaging technology used to visualise internal organs, their size, structure, and any pathological lesions using high frequency sound. (Humans can only hear in the range of about 30 to 20,000 cycles per second while ultrasonography frequency falls in the megahertz range: millions of cycles per second). Ultrasound is different from x-ray because it uses mechanical sound energy rather than radiation to produce images. Furthermore, ultrasound provides a thin tomographic slice (similar to CT), rather than a flat plane projection like x-ray or fluoroscopy. It also has the advantage of being real-time rather than static and it can display not only images, but Doppler information as well. This is very useful in assessment of blood flow.

For ultrasound imaging, a hand-held probe (called a scan head) is placed directly on the abdominal wall. Acoustic gel is used to couple the probe to the body, because the high frequency sound waves do not travel well through air.

After a short introduction (physics and clinical examples) in this workshop, the students are able to practice ultrasound on each other. The normal anatomy of several intra-abdominal organs and vascular structures will be visualised.

Positive energy in cancer treatment

Department: Radiation Oncology, UMCG

Supervisors: Hiske van der Weide MD, Roel Kierkels MS, Stefan Both PhD FAAPM

Radiation oncology is a rapidly evolving field where innovative technology, physics, and medicine merge and enhance one another. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) is a relatively new radiation therapy technique that involves protons instead of traditional X-rays. PBS offers new opportunities for cancer patients, who benefit from significant reduction of radiation exposure to normal tissues. In certain patients this may lead to less side effects and consequent irreversible late complications of treatment.

During this workshop, you will have the opportunity to participate in our ‘radiotherapy operating room’. In an interactive manner, you will experience the processes of radiation treatment planning and radiation delivery. You will be part of discussion on patient selection including ethical issues and cost effectiveness, and ongoing scientific investigations to compare PBS to other radiation therapy techniques.”

Liver transplantation with machine perfusion

Department: Surgery

Supervisor: O.B. van Leeuwen

Every year in the Netherlands one out of three donor livers are not used for transplantation. With an ageing population with a rising BMI, more and more donor livers are expected to be declined for transplantation in the coming years.

The University Medical Center Groningen is leading in the field of organ preservation. Every declined liver in the Netherlands is currently tested in Groningen by using a perfusion device. Many of the previously declined livers are now actually transplanted with very good results.

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the difficult anatomy of the upper abdominal region and you will practice preparing (porcine) donor livers for ‘transplantation’ and machine perfusion. You will cannulate the aorta and the portal vein and close all arterial branches of the hepatic artery. Hereafter, you can test whether you performed these procedures in a waterproof manner as your liver will be connected to the perfusion machine.

After this workshop, you will be not only be an expert in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic anatomy, but also in suturing and knot tying.

Surgical treatment of end-stage heart failure: LVAD

Department:     Cardiothoracic Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor:        Michiel Erasmus MD PhD, Prof. Massimo Mariani MD PhD

Heart failure is an increasing problem. Until recently, heart transplantation was the only effective option to prolong survival of patients with end-stage heart failure. Nowadays it can be treated by implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). In this workshop the problem of end-stage heart failure, the relevant cardiac anatomy, and concepts of different types of left ventricular assist devices will be discussed (emergency implantation and destination therapy). The implantation technique of an internal LVAD used for destination therapy will be shown on a cadaver. Four randomly selected students will assist in this operation and the rest of the participants will follow the implantation closely on a live video stream, supervised by a cardiothoracic surgeon. After this workshop, medical students will understand the entity of heart failure and the concepts and problems related to LVAD therapy.

How to perform tracheal intubation

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen
Supervisor: Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers too, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of airway management. Participants will have to solve different ventilation problems. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

How to perform IV injections

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen
Supervisor: Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers as well, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of vascular access. Participants will practice different intravascular access routes. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) and bronchoscopy

Department: Anesthesiology, UMCG

Supervisors: Jayant Jainandunsing MD, E.M.E. (Nini) Craenen MD

Anaesthesiologists are medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgery. Our main tasks are airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain.

The field of Anaesthesiology is not only restricted to the operating room. Anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and Emergency medicine including Mobile Medical Trauma Team.

In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), residents and staff members are trained in our state of the art Skills Lab where all kinds of medical and/or peri-operative situations can be simulated.

The training to become an anaesthesiologist consists of a 5-year program. The main pillars of anaesthesiological training are physiology and pharmacology. After residency, additional training can be done to become a super-specialist such as cardiac anaesthesiology, paediatric anaesthesiology, intensive care, pain management or emergency care.

Cardiac-Anaesthesiologists are involved in cardiac and lung surgery, one of the tools used to assess cardiac function is transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). TEE is one of the essential tools during cardiac surgery to asses function and provide the surgeon with additional information. In this workshop you will get an introduction into TEE. After a short introduction you will be challenged to make a TEE yourself on a virtual reality simulator. Another clinical assessment tool is the bronchoscope. During lung surgery, the use of a bronchoscopy is necessary to asses positioning of the airway tube and to see whether tracheal suture lines are properly made. In this workshop you will get a hands-on experience on our bronchoscopy simulator.

Simplicity in complex woundcare

Department: Dermatology

Supervisor: Dr. M. Ruettermann (plastic surgeon), Dr. M.J. Wiegman (dermatologist)

An undisturbed primary wound healing proceeds according to a number of phases (hemostasis, inflammation, regeneration, maturation). A large number of factors play a role in these phases. When one factor is missing and a phase cannot be fully completed, the healing process stagnates and a complex wound arises. Wound care is therefore a lot more complex. In addition, the extensive range of wound care products on the market also plays an influential role. Factors that play a part in the choice of the suitable product are: purpose of the wound care (moist, dry, cleaning, protection, comfort, etc.) based on evidence, best practice and, cost effectiveness. A tool to determine your goal is to use the international classification model TIME. By approaching a wound in a systematic way your goal becomes clear. Then choose the product based on your goal. On the basis of case studies, you learn to classify a wound and thereby choose the most suitable material to treat the wound efficiently and cost-effectively.

Wednesday June 5th

Basic life support: Heroes aren’t born, they are trained

Department: Wenckebach Training Institute, UMCG

Supervisor: Wim J.C. Grimberg, Docent-Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor,

Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Macro- and microscopic suturing

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Annemieke van Oosten, PhD, Catriene Thuring, DVM, PhD

Microsurgical techniques have gained importance in recent years. The more delicate and sophisticated a surgical technique is, the more it requires training and education. The purpose of this workshop is to teach the students the proper way to handle their surgical instruments, how to tie a suture in the correct way, and to provide an opportunity to test their hands in the fine art and skill of micro suturing.

Please note:

For permission to participate in the workshop it is important that you have not had contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the workshop. In this way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Transgenders: a debate with the UMCG genderteam and a patient

Department: Genderteam UMCG (gynaecology and plastic surgery)

Supervisors: Tim R. Middelberg MD PhD, Tallechien M.T. Tempelman MD, M. van den Berg MD, Marga Tjallingii MSc

Transgender people experience a mismatch between their gender identity or gender expression and their assigned sex. Transgender is an umbrella term, because in addition to including trans men and trans women (whose binary gender identity is the opposite of their assigned sex), it may also include gender queer people (whose identities are not exclusively masculine or feminine, for example: bigender, pangender, genderfluid, or agender).

Since the late 70’s the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands offers a treatment programme for transgenders, according to the professional standards of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH). Once patients have been diagnosed with genderdysphoria by the psychiatrist, the ‘real life phase’ starts. This includes living their gender identity and cross sex hormone therapy. When the ‘real-life phase’ has been followed through with success, one can apply for sex reassignment surgery. After these operations, lifelong continuation of cross sex hormone therapy is needed to maintain secondary sex characteristics of the desired gender.

What does the transition contain and cause physically, mentally, and socially and how can we guide the patients in this process? During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a member of the UMCG Genderteam and a transgender patient.

Advances in organ preservation for transplantation

Department:  Groningen Transplant Center, UMCG

Supervisor:   Cyril Moers MD PhD

Machine preservation of donor organs is becoming more common by the day as a standard technique to preserve and transport organs. It creates possibilities to improve the quality of organs and test the viability. More importantly, machine perfusion can increase the number of available donor organs. During this interactive hands-on workshop, you will receive expert insights from specialists about this innovative way of donation and transplantation. Additionally, you can work under the supervision of surgeons to connect a (porcine) kidney to a hypo- and normothermic machine. This workshop gives you the opportunity to network with young medical and biomedical students who are active in the clinic or research area. Besides, these students can teach you how to take biopsies properly.  The spaces in this workshop  are limited, so make sure to sign up so you don’t miss out!

Practical ultrasound

Department: Medical Imaging Centre (MIC), UMCG

Supervisor: Theo Kok MD PhD

Medical ultrasonography (sonography or ultrasound) is a diagnostic imaging technology used to visualise internal organs, their size, structure, and any pathological lesions using high frequency sound. (Humans can only hear in the range of about 30 to 20,000 cycles per second while ultrasonography frequency falls in the megahertz range: millions of cycles per second). Ultrasound is different from x-ray because it uses mechanical sound energy rather than radiation to produce images. Furthermore, ultrasound provides a thin tomographic slice (similar to CT), rather than a flat plane projection like x-ray or fluoroscopy. It also has the advantage of being real-time rather than static and it can display not only images, but Doppler information as well. This is very useful in assessment of blood flow.

For ultrasound imaging, a hand-held probe (called a scan head) is placed directly on the abdominal wall. Acoustic gel is used to couple the probe to the body, because the high frequency sound waves do not travel well through air.

After a short introduction (physics and clinical examples) in this workshop, the students are able to practice ultrasound on each other. The normal anatomy of several intra-abdominal organs and vascular structures will be visualised.

Fast motor actions, cognition and adaptations

Department: Human Movement Sciences University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG)

Supervisor: Prof. Egbert Otten PhD

Many of the fast motor actions that we perform in everyday life have become automatic and are performed using rules that escape higher cognition. That makes them fast, and unloads parts of the brain that are used for different functions. In order to demonstrate this, several experiments will be conducted that include different loads, movement directions, pointing tasks that interfere with balance, and body mapping using both the visual system and the proprioceptive system. These experiments demonstrate our implicit assumptions about the task at hand and that these assumptions may be wrong. They also show our inability to compensate for the given errors, using higher cognition. This has direct consequences for motor learning of fast actions and the design of environments and devices in which reliable motor actions are required. The experiments also demonstrate strong and weak mappings of the sensory system onto the motor system. These mappings make sense if we reflect on the biological functions for which they appeared in evolution and developed during ontogeny. The results of the experiments may be surprising, which is an important condition and driving force for scientific research.

Dissection of human brain

Department:     Anatomy, UMCG

Supervisor:       Gerben Ruesink BSc, Sussan Quinten MSc

Dissection of the human body in general and of the brain in particular is an underexposed part of the average medical curriculum. In this context, the workshop “Dissection of the human brain” will address this omission. The workshop will be organised in the dissection room of the Anatomy Department of the UMCG and is especially intended for students with a special interest in the brain.

The workshop will start with inspection of the external parts of the human brain. The morphology of meninges, blood vessels and, neocortical areas are central topics. Subsequently transversal and horizontal sections will be cut in order to inspect the inner parts of the brain. Attention will be paid to the three-dimensional location of the cortical, extrapyramidal and, limbic structures.

At the end of the workshop students will have gained a better insight in the structure and function of the human brain.

Plastic surgery: how does a tissue expander work? How is detailed exam of the hand performed?

Department: Plastic Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen

Supervisors: Vera van Aalst, plastic surgeon, Sophie Post, resident plastic surgery

Plastic surgeons perform a variety of different reconstructive and aesthetic procedures. These vary from basic wound care to extensive reconstructions after tissue loss or removal due to trauma or disease, like cancer.

At the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) we collaborate with many different medical specialists.

Considering the high incidence of breast cancer (more than 1 in 8 women will have breast cancer in their life time), a large part of our practice focuses on breast reconstruction after cancer removal. For this reconstruction, we not only have the option of using patients’ own tissue, but also implants. A tissue expander is a temporary implant which we use to expand soft tissue to create a pocket for a permanent implant.

Another focus of our practice is hand surgery. To be able to make a correct diagnosis and choose to appropriate (surgical) treatment it is important to perform a detailed and comprehensive exam of the hand.

There are two main goals of this workshop. First, to familiarize participants with different treatment options available for breast reconstruction. Specifically, they will learn how to use (and fill) a tissue expander.  Secondly, participants will learn how to perform a detailed and comprehensive hand exam.

Onco-pathology: diagnose a biopsy

Department:   Oncology, UMCG

Supervisor:     Prof. Harry Hollema MD PhD

Despite the introduction of sophisticated techniques in modern pathology, macroscopic interpretation of resection specimens remains a cornerstone in the daily practice of surgical pathology. After a short introduction regarding the role of pathology in oncologic patient care and basic terminology the participants will be asked to interpret five macroscopic specimens from surgical resections. Questions will be focused on the most likely diagnosis, carcinogenesis and, T stage in relation to prognosis and therapy. Four pathologists will be present to assist and answer questions during the workshop.

Liver transplantation with machine perfusion

Department: Surgery

Supervisor: O.B. van Leeuwen

Every year in the Netherlands one out of three donor livers are not used for transplantation. With an ageing population with a rising BMI, more and more donor livers are expected to be declined for transplantation in the coming years.

The University Medical Center Groningen is leading in the field of organ preservation. Every declined liver in the Netherlands is currently tested in Groningen by using a perfusion device. Many of the previously declined livers are now actually transplanted with very good results.

In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the difficult anatomy of the upper abdominal region and you will practice preparing (porcine) donor livers for ‘transplantation’ and machine perfusion. You will cannulate the aorta and the portal vein and close all arterial branches of the hepatic artery. Hereafter, you can test whether you performed these procedures in a waterproof manner as your liver will be connected to the perfusion machine.

After this workshop, you will be not only be an expert in the hepatobiliary and pancreatic anatomy, but also in suturing and knot tying.

The miracle of giving birth

Department Clinical Training Center, UMCG

Supervisors: Marco A.C. Versluis MD PhD, Dennis Beekhuis MD

General childbirth, also known as labour, is an unique event showing the miracle and power of nature. Although it is a physiological event of itself, child birth is one of the most fascinating aspects of medicine, which mostly deals with pathophysiological processes.

Childbirth is the culmination of the gestation and pregnancy period with the expulsion of one or more newborn babies from a women’s uterus into a completely different environment. At that particular moment, being disconnected from the mother’s circulation after cutting the umbilical cord, the newborn faces a very serious and complicated adaptation of his own circulation to the onset of his own respiratory system.

The process of a normal vaginal human childbirth is categorised into four stages. Stage 1: The onset of birth is initiated by a metabolic change in the infant which causes the release of the hormones needed for uterine contractions. Stage 2: The process of shortening and dilation of the uterine cervix is caused by uterine contractions. This process facilitates the head of the infant to enter into the birth canal. Stage 3: The continuation of uterine contractions with the help of the mothers pressing, pushing the baby through the birth canal into the baby’s new world. Stage 4: The delivery of the placenta. The expulsion of the placenta mostly starts spontaneously approximately twenty minutes after the occlusion and the cutting of the umbilical cord.

During this workshop more details will be given on monitoring labour, pain control, and problems that may happen before and during delivery including the therapeutic possibilities if these problems occur. You are also given the opportunity to deliver a baby using a mannequin, simulating the real situation.

How to perform IV injections

Department:              Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen
Supervisor:                Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers as well, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of vascular access. Participants will practice different intravascular access routes. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

How to perform tracheal intubation

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen
Supervisor:    Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers too, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of airway management. Participants will have to solve different ventilation problems. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

Thursday June 6th

Basic life support: Heroes aren’t born, they are trained

Department: Wenckebach Training Institute, UMCG

Supervisor: Wim J.C. Grimberg, Docent-Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor,

Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Crime scene or no crime scene?

Department: Community Health Service (GGD) Groningen

Supervisors: Taco van Mesdag and Tatjana Naujocks, both MD forensic medicine

Finding a dead person requires further investigation. In the first place it is necessary to be sure a person is dead indeed and in the second place it is important to find out whether a person died from natural causes or not. Last but not least, declaring a person dead and signing the death certificate requires certainty about the identity of the person you want to declare dead. Making mistakes in these situations creates a lot of problems for the ‘living-dead’ person.

During this workshop we will present two crime scene investigations, not the ones you can see on TV, but the ones we see in real life!

Questions like: what happened here, when, why and to whom did it happen, will have to be answered and the students will have the opportunity to participate.

Real forensic investigators will be present to join us in the investigations. The bodies – of course – won’t be real, but will be represented by two LOTUS-volunteers. LOTUS is an organization that participates in all kinds of training where casualties/victims are needed, dead or alive. They do a perfect job by playing their roles lifelike, or in our cases dead like.

Plastic surgery: how does a tissue expander work? How is detailed exam of the hand performed?

Department: Plastic Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen

Supervisors: Vera van Aalst, plastic surgeon, Sophie Post, resident plastic surgery

Plastic surgeons perform a variety of different reconstructive and aesthetic procedures. These vary from basic wound care to extensive reconstructions after tissue loss or removal due to trauma or disease, like cancer.

At the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) we collaborate with many different medical specialists.

Considering the high incidence of breast cancer (more than 1 in 8 women will have breast cancer in their life time), a large part of our practice focuses on breast reconstruction after cancer removal. For this reconstruction, we not only have the option of using patients’ own tissue, but also implants. A tissue expander is a temporary implant which we use to expand soft tissue to create a pocket for a permanent implant.

Another focus of our practice is hand surgery. To be able to make a correct diagnosis and choose to appropriate (surgical) treatment it is important to perform a detailed and comprehensive exam of the hand.

There are two main goals of this workshop. First, to familiarize participants with different treatment options available for breast reconstruction. Specifically, they will learn how to use (and fill) a tissue expander.  Secondly, participants will learn how to perform a detailed and comprehensive hand exam.

Transgenders: a debate with the UMCG genderteam and a patient

Department: Genderteam UMCG (gynaecology and plastic surgery)

Supervisors: Tim R. Middelberg MD PhD, Tallechien M.T. Tempelman MD, M. van den Berg MD, Marga Tjallingii MSc

Transgender people experience a mismatch between their gender identity or gender expression and their assigned sex. Transgender is an umbrella term, because in addition to including trans men and trans women (whose binary gender identity is the opposite of their assigned sex), it may also include gender queer people (whose identities are not exclusively masculine or feminine, for example: bigender, pangender, genderfluid, or agender).

Since the late 70’s the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands offers a treatment programme for transgenders, according to the professional standards of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH). Once patients have been diagnosed with genderdysphoria by the psychiatrist, the ‘real life phase’ starts. This includes living their gender identity and cross sex hormone therapy. When the ‘real-life phase’ has been followed through with success, one can apply for sex reassignment surgery. After these operations, lifelong continuation of cross sex hormone therapy is needed to maintain secondary sex characteristics of the desired gender.

What does the transition contain and cause physically, mentally, and socially and how can we guide the patients in this process? During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a member of the UMCG Genderteam and a transgender patient.

Inside the psychotic experience (conversation with a patient)

Department: Psychiatry, UMCG

Supervisor: Frank D. van Es MD

Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as loss of contact with reality. Patients experiencing psychosis may report hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) or delusional beliefs (false beliefs about what is taking place or who one is). The combination of both can cause an often severe disruption to perception, thinking, emotion, and behaviour. Depending on its severity, a psychotic episode may thus be accompanied by unusual or bizarre behaviour, as well as difficulty with social interaction and, impairment in carrying out daily life activities. As a result, patients with psychosis are caught in a hostile environment. They are therefore in need of your dedication and medical skills: how can you meet their needs? How can you avoid stigma and promote health and social recovery?

During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a psychiatrist and a patient who has suffered from psychosis.

An introduction in treating life-threatening situations in the ICU

Department: Department of Critical Care, UMCG

Supervisor: J.C.C. van der Horst, MD PhD, Dinald Maatman, Nursing Staff

Implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the ICU to provide care in often life-threatening situations, focused attention on the relevance of leadership behaviour. Effective, coordinated, and safe patient care challenge even the most experienced ICU teams daily. Leadership behaviour is defined as the process of influencing others to understand and agree about what needs to be done and how to do it, and facilitating individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared objectives. Simulation training is useful for teaching team-based crisis management skills and is now considered essential in developing and maintaining competencies for ICU workers.

In our high fidelity simulation center, participants of the workshop will become familiar with some stepwise elements of the treatment, such as resuscitation and airway management of critically ill patients. The non-technical skills such as leadership, communication, and cooperation are also emphasised. The experiences may contribute to the development of knowledge and skills in decision-making and teamwork during the treatment of critically ill patients.

Guided tour in the central animal facility of the UMCG

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Catriene Thuring, DVM, PhD, Annemieke van Oosten, PhD

Many major findings in the field of human medicine have been established
following animal experiments. To date, animal experimentation is still a
very important way to gain data and knowledge mandatory to develop new
procedures in modern human medicine.

Within the UMCG all animal experimental work is organised in the Central Animal Facility.
The workshop consists of a guided tour in this facility. During the tour the current status of laboratory animal experimentation within the UMCG will be presented to you.

Please note:

For permission to participate in the tour it is important that you have not had contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the tour. In this way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Suturing

Department: Surgery, UMCG

Get a head start on learning a fundamental surgical skill. Our suturing workshop provides you with the training and materials to practice a variety of suturing methods (simple interrupted, simple continuous and, subcutaneous) on real porcine skin. The workshop consists of two parts. The first part is a theoretical outline of several aspects of wound closure, illustrated with pictures and short animations. The second part is a practical session that features the guidance of an attending surgeon, allowing personal instruction for every participant. By the end of the workshop, students leave with basic skills necessary to practice basic suturing and achieve mastery.

Note: The practicing will be on real pig’s legs.

Fix a mandibular fracture yourself

Department: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: Prof. Ruud R.M. Bos DMD PhD, Dr. Baucke van Minnen

The treatment of mandibular fractures has evolved greatly over the past 50 years. Biomechinal principles that have been developed in laboratory models are applied to clinical practice in order to allow for immediate mobilization and rehabilitation of the injured part.

The goal of this workshop is to give insight in the widely accepted treatment modality of mandibular fractures: internal fixation with mini plates and screws. After a short introduction of the principles of mandibular fracture treatment, the participants will perform an osteosynthesis of mandibular fractures in a polyurethane mandible with mini plates and screws.

Dental implants in the aesthetic zone

Department: Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, UMCG Prosthetic Dentistry, UMCG

Supervisors: Prof. Henny J.A. Meijer DMD PhD, Prof. Gerry M. Raghoebar DMD PhD, Wim J.W.A. Slot DMD PhD, Charlotte Jensen DMD PhD

Losing one or more teeth in the aesthetic zone has a great impact on a person. Inserting root-form dental implants and restoring them with ceramic crowns has proven to be a reliable method to solve the problem. The dental literature shows excellent survival rates of single-tooth restorations on dental implants, varying from 96.1% to 98.9% after 7.5 years in function. Studies that address aesthetics and patient satisfaction reveal it is a very sensitive method in the eye of the professional, but that patients are generally very satisfied. This workshop comprises a lecture with the possibilities of dental implants, different treatment steps and aesthetic results. The second part of the workshop is a hands-on training in which the participant actually places a dental implant in a model, imitating the surgical part of the treatment. The workshop is supported by Straumann Dental Implants, the Netherlands.

Surgical treatment of coronary artery disease: beating-heart CABG

Department: Cardiothoracic Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: Michiel Erasmus MD PhD, Prof. Massimo Mariani MD PhD, Wobbe Bouma, MD PhD

Coronary artery disease affects millions of patients worldwide and is highly related to the western lifestyle. It is a disease that develops slowly and affects both the cardiac morphology and function over the years. This workshop will focus on the morphology of ischemic hearts and the surgical strategies to prolong survival when significant stenosis causes serious complaints. Lectures are combined with a live stream coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation on a beating-heart model in a human cadaver. Four randomly selected students will assist the operation. The rest of the participants will follow the operation closely via a live video stream, supervised by a cardiothoracic surgeon.

How to perform tracheal intubation

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen

Supervisor:    Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers too, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of airway management. Participants will have to solve different ventilation problems. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

How to perform IV injections

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen
Supervisor: Two anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers as well, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and last but not least emergency medicine including the helicopter Mobile Medical Team. Besides their clinical work anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab where all kinds of situations can be simulated. Research in the UMCG is focused on pharmacokinetics (what the body does to a drug), pharmacodynamics (what a drug does to the body), neuroscience, hemodynamics, and blood coagulation.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of vascular access. Participants will practice different intravascular access routes. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) and bronchoscopy

Department: Anesthesiology, UMCG

Supervisors: Jayant Jainandunsing MD, E.M.E. (Nini) Craenen MD

Anaesthesiologists are medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgery. Our main tasks are airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain.

The field of Anaesthesiology is not only restricted to the operating room. Anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics, and Emergency medicine including Mobile Medical Trauma Team.

In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), residents and staff members are trained in our state of the art Skills Lab where all kinds of medical and/or peri-operative situations can be simulated.

The training to become an anaesthesiologist consists of a 5-year program. The main pillars of anaesthesiological training are physiology and pharmacology. After residency, additional training can be done to become a super-specialist such as cardiac anaesthesiology, paediatric anaesthesiology, intensive care, pain management or emergency care.

Cardiac-Anaesthesiologists are involved in cardiac and lung surgery, one of the tools used to assess cardiac function is transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). TEE is one of the essential tools during cardiac surgery to asses function and provide the surgeon with additional information. In this workshop you will get an introduction into TEE. After a short introduction you will be challenged to make a TEE yourself on a virtual reality simulator. Another clinical assessment tool is the bronchoscope. During lung surgery, the use of a bronchoscopy is necessary to asses positioning of the airway tube and to see whether tracheal suture lines are properly made. In this workshop you will get a hands-on experience on our bronchoscopy simulator.