Digital Congress

You can enjoy this years ISCOMS physically in Groningen and virtually on the digital platform. We are aware that some of you are not able to come to the congres in Groningen, nevertheless we want to give everyone the opportunity to experience ISCOMS. So, we as ISCOMS have made it possible to give everyone the opportunity to take part in the congress through the digital platform. The digital platform is a good reflection of the physical congress. This is by presenting various interactive workshops. Each day you can choose between two workshops you find interesting. There will also be IMED talks in which professionals will tell a story about their career and what you can learn from them.

The workshops will have different biomedical topics, such as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, movement science and biomedical sciences each day. The digital workshop are quite similar to the physical workshop. The workshops are set up to ask the professionals any questions you have. Maybe they will ask you a question as well. Each day there will be two workshops available. You can choose one of the two you find interesting to follow. The workshop are scheduled roughly between 12:00 and 13:00 Central European time.

The digital platform will include IMED talks based on the popular format of Ted talk. The IMED talks will be informative but with a touch of a personal story from a professional. Contrary to the workshops, the IMED talks will not have time restrictions during the congress. The IMED Talks are available any time of the day during the congress.

DIGITAL PARTICIPATION PRESENTING PARTICIPANTS:

Poster presentations:
On the physical congress you will get the chance to present your poster in front of a select
international audience in an interactive way. When you are required to participate digitally
your poster will be available on our digital platform but unfortunately without interaction.
So by attending the congress physically you will get the most out of your poster presentation.

Oral and plenary presentations:

If you are selected to present your research as an oral or plenary presentation and not able to join ISCOMS on-site, we will give you the opportunity to present your research through a live stream connection in your session. In this way you will still be able to present your research.

Online Workshops Wednesday June 8th

Department: Community Health Service (GGD) Groningen

Supervisors: Taco van Mesdag and Tatjana Naujocks, both MD forensic medicine 

Finding a dead person requires further investigation. In the first place it is necessary to be sure a person is dead indeed. Secondly, it is important to find out whether a person died from natural causes or not. Last but not least, declaring a person dead and signing the death certificate requires certainty about the identity of the person you want to declare dead. Making mistakes in these situations creates a lot of problems for the ‘living-dead’ person.

During this workshop we will present one crime scene investigation, not as you see them on TV, but as it is in real life. Questions like: what happened here, when, why and to whom did it happen will have to be answered.

Real forensic investigators will be present to join us in the investigation. The body – of course – won’t be real, but will be represented by a so called LOTUS-volunteer. LOTUS is an organization that participates in all kinds of training where casualties/victims are needed, dead or alive. They do a perfect job by playing their roles lifelike, or in our case deathlike.

We’d appreciate your presence at the workshops!

Department: Neuro anatomy

Supervisor: Gerben Ruesink BSc

Dissection of the human body in general and of the brain in particular is an underexposed part of the average medical curriculum. In this context, the workshop “Dissection of the human brain” will address this omission. The workshop will be organised as a livestream and is especially intended for students with a specific interest in the brain. We will virtually dissect the brain using the free open source program MRIcron (https://www.nitrc.org/projects/mricron/), which participants could also download and install on their own computer to make the workshop even more interactive.

The workshop will start with inspection of the external parts of the human brain. The morphology of meninges, blood vessels and, neocortical areas are central topics. Subsequently, transversal and horizontal sections of fixated human brains will be used to inspect the inner parts of the brain. Attention will be paid to the three-dimensional location of the cortical, extrapyramidal and, limbic structures. At the end of the workshop students will have gained a better insight in the structure and function of the human brain.

Online Workshops Thursday June 9th

Department: Community Health Service (GGD) Groningen
Supervisors: Taco van Mesdag and Tatjana Naujocks, both MD forensic medicine 

Finding a dead person requires further investigation. In the first place it is necessary to be sure a person is dead indeed. Secondly, it is important to find out whether a person died from natural causes or not. Last but not least, declaring a person dead and signing the death certificate requires certainty about the identity of the person you want to declare dead. Making mistakes in these situations creates a lot of problems for the ‘living-dead’ person.

During this workshop we will present one crime scene investigation, not as you see them on TV, but as it is in real life. Questions like: what happened here, when, why and to whom did it happen will have to be answered.

Real forensic investigators will be present to join us in the investigation. The body – of course – won’t be real, but will be represented by a so called LOTUS-volunteer. LOTUS is an organization that participates in all kinds of training where casualties/victims are needed, dead or alive. They do a perfect job by playing their roles lifelike, or in our case deathlike.

We’d appreciate your presence at the workshops!

Supervisors: Marco Versluis MD PhD, Girbe Buist PhD

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has changed the way we live and has shown how we are all interconnected and interdependent. Another example of an urgent threat to our existence is climate change. Fueled by unsustainable overconsumption, climate change impacts health both directly and indirectly. It illustrates well the time we live in with complex challenges to health, the sustainability of our civilization and the natural as well as human made systems that support us. Planetary health is a solutions-oriented, transdisciplinary field and social movement focused on analyzing and addressing the impacts of human disruptions to Earth’s natural systems, health and life on Earth. Dealing with the challenges and ensuring wellbeing for all people, requires collaboration across nations and professions. This workshop aims to inspire the future generation of health care workers and other professionals to accept the challenge by exploring current threats and possible solutions.

Department: Biomedical Sciences of Cells and Systems, section Anatomy and Medical Physiology

Supervisors: Eric Sietsema & Annelies van der Molen

Physiology labs are used for practicals and play an important part in the education at the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Groningen. These practicals involve diverse physiological topics such as cardiovascular, respiratory, exercise and neurophysiology labs. During these practicals, students switch between roles of researcher and participant, and they develop a critical view in generating physiological data, learn to analyse and interpret results, and get a great chance to apply the theory from the lectures into practice.

The respiratory lab includes pulmonary function tests, which play an important part in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, such as asthma and COPD. As a doctor or clinical researcher in this field, it is essential to accurately analyse and interpret spirometry testing results and moreover understand the underlying lung physiology.

We developed a digital version of this workshop to be able to teach students the ‘practice’ online, which we now use to get our students better prepared. It also gives you the opportunity to experience our respiratory laboratory digitally in Gathertown. So next to the regular workshop you can find more about physiology in Gathertown. Join our workshop, watch the video clips, actively participate in answering the questions and breathe normally.

Online Workshops Friday June 10th

Department: Community Health Service (GGD) Groningen
Supervisors: Taco van Mesdag and Tatjana Naujocks, both MD forensic medicine 

Finding a dead person requires further investigation. In the first place it is necessary to be sure a person is dead indeed. Secondly, it is important to find out whether a person died from natural causes or not. Last but not least, declaring a person dead and signing the death certificate requires certainty about the identity of the person you want to declare dead. Making mistakes in these situations creates a lot of problems for the ‘living-dead’ person.

During this workshop we will present one crime scene investigation, not as you see them on TV, but as it is in real life. Questions like: what happened here, when, why and to whom did it happen will have to be answered.

Real forensic investigators will be present to join us in the investigation. The body – of course – won’t be real, but will be represented by a so called LOTUS-volunteer. LOTUS is an organization that participates in all kinds of training where casualties/victims are needed, dead or alive. They do a perfect job by playing their roles lifelike, or in our case deathlike.

We’d appreciate your presence at the workshops!

Supervisors: Marco Versluis MD PhD, Girbe Buist PhD

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has changed the way we live and has shown how we are all interconnected and interdependent. Another example of an urgent threat to our existence is climate change. Fueled by unsustainable overconsumption, climate change impacts health both directly and indirectly. It illustrates well the time we live in with complex challenges to health, the sustainability of our civilization and the natural as well as human made systems that support us. Planetary health is a solutions-oriented, transdisciplinary field and social movement focused on analyzing and addressing the impacts of human disruptions to Earth’s natural systems, health and life on Earth. Dealing with the challenges and ensuring wellbeing for all people, requires collaboration across nations and professions. This workshop aims to inspire the future generation of health care workers and other professionals to accept the challenge by exploring current threats and possible solutions.

Department: Surgical Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, UMCG

Supervisors: Prof. Ton Lisman PhD

My laboratory studies blood clotting disorders in patients with liver diseases. As the liver is the site of synthesis of most proteins involved in blood clot formation, patients with advanced liver disease acquire complex changes in their blood clotting system. Curiously both bleeding problems and thrombotic complications can occur in patients with liver diseases, and strategies on how to best prevent or treat these complications in liver disease patients are not well established. Thrombosis of the portal vein is very rare in the general population, but occurs frequently in patients with chronic liver diseases. Curiously, portal vein thrombosis can be completely asymptomatic, and therefore it is not well established whether all patients require treatment. In addition, patients that are treated with anticoagulant drugs often do not resolve their thrombus, which is in contrast to treatment of venous thromboses in other vascular beds (for example a deep vein thrombosis of the leg, in which anticoagulant treatment is almost always successful).

In this workshop I will share some unexpected findings we recently obtained by studying the composition of portal vein thrombi in patients with chronic liver disease. I will explain why the observations done in our study have to potential to change clinical practice and highlight opportunities and challenges we had in this study. This study is an example of how collaboration between laboratory and clinic, between different hospitals, and between different clinical and basic science specialties have led to a true breakthrough in our understanding of the pathogenesis and potentially also the treatment of this complication of chronic liver disease. Lessons learnt by us may be helpful in your own research.