Workshops

During ISCOMS, it is possible to participate in different kinds of workshops. You can actively participate in various hands-on workshops, but it is also possible to choose for a more informative workshop, for example an interactive lecture. 

Below you can see all different kinds of workshops available during ISCOMS 2022.

Wednesday June 8th

Department: Wenckebach Institute for Education and Training

Supervisor:  Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Catriene Thuring VMD PhD and Annemieke van Oosten PhD

Many major findings in the field of human medicine have been established following animal experiments. To date, animal experimentation is still a very important way to gain data and knowledge mandatory to develop new procedures in modern human medicine. Within the UMCG all animal experimental work is organised in the Central Animal Facility. The workshop consists of a guided tour in this facility. During the tour the current status of laboratory animal experimentation within the UMCG will be presented to you.

Please note:

In order to participate in the tour it is important that you did not have contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the tour. This way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Department: Orthopaedics / Trauma

Supervisor: Patrick Nieboer MD

What would you do when more patients enter the emergency room than you can handle? How would you decide which patient gets a ticket to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) / Operating Room (OR) when there are only limited resources available? What would you do if patients’ conditions are, or become life threatening and help is not directly available?

In this workshop you, as a group, will have to make and motivate decisions about which patients you are going to treat and which patients not. Together we will reflect on the choices you make.

Department: Clinical Training Center, UMCG

Supervisors: Marco A.C. Versluis MD PhD, Dennis Beekhuis MD

General childbirth, also known as labour, is an unique event showing the miracle and power of nature. Although it is a physiological event of itself, childbirth is one of the most fascinating aspects of medicine, which mostly deals with pathophysiological processes.

Childbirth is the culmination of the gestation and pregnancy period with the expulsion of one or more newborn babies from a women’s uterus into a completely different environment. At that particular moment, being disconnected from the mother’s circulation after cutting the umbilical cord, the newborn faces a very serious and complicated adaptation of his own circulation to the onset of his own respiratory system.

The process of a normal vaginal human childbirth is categorised into four stages.

  • Stage 1: The onset of birth is initiated by a metabolic change in the infant which causes the release of the hormones needed for uterine contractions.
  • Stage 2: The process of shortening and dilation of the uterine cervix is caused by uterine contractions. This process facilitates the head of the infant to enter the birth canal.
  • Stage 3: The continuation of uterine contractions with the help of the mothers pressing, pushing the baby through the birth canal into the baby’s new world.
  • Stage 4: The delivery of the placenta. The expulsion of the placenta mostly starts spontaneously approximately twenty minutes after the occlusion and the cutting of the umbilical cord.

During this workshop more details will be given on monitoring labour, pain control, and problems that may happen before and during delivery including the therapeutic possibilities if these problems occur. You are also given the opportunity to deliver a baby using a mannequin, simulating the real situation.

Department: Radiation Oncology, UMCG

Supervisors: Prof. Stefan Both  MD PhD

Radiation oncology is a rapidly evolving field where innovative technology, physics, and medicine merge and enhance one another. Pencil beam scanning (PBS) is a relatively new radiation therapy technique that involves protons instead of traditional X-rays. PBS offers new opportunities for cancer patients, who benefit from significant reduction of radiation exposure to normal tissues. In certain patients this may lead to less side effects and consequent irreversible late complications of treatment.

During this workshop, you will have the opportunity to participate in our ‘radiotherapy operating room’. In an interactive manner, you will experience the processes of radiation treatment planning and radiation delivery. You will be part of discussion on patient selection including ethical issues and cost effectiveness, and ongoing scientific investigations to compare PBS to other radiation therapy techniques.

Department: Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: H. Sijbrand Hofker MD

Get a head start on learning a fundamental surgical skill. Our suturing workshop provides you with the training and materials to practice a variety of suturing methods (simple interrupted, simple continuous and subcutaneous) on real porcine skin. The workshop consists of two parts. The first part is a theoretical outline of several aspects of wound closure, illustrated with pictures and short animations. The second part is a practical session that features the guidance of an attending surgeon, allowing personal instruction for every participant. By the end of the workshop, students leave with basic skills necessary to practice basic suturing and achieve mastery.

Note: The practicing will be on real pig’s legs.

Department: Genderteam UMCG

Supervisor: A. G. Schuringa

Transgender people experience a mismatch between their gender identity or gender expression and their assigned sex. Transgender is an umbrella term, because in addition to including trans men and trans women (whose binary gender identity is the opposite of their assigned sex), it may also include gender queer people (whose identities are not exclusively masculine or feminine, for example: bigender, pangender, genderfluid, or agender).

Since the late ‘70s the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands offers a treatment programme for transgenders, according to the professional standards of the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH). Once patients have been diagnosed with gender dysphoria by the psychiatrist, the ‘real life phase’ starts. This includes living their gender identity and cross sex hormone therapy. When the ‘real-life phase’ has been followed through with success, one can apply for sex reassignment surgery. After these operations, lifelong continuation of cross sex hormone therapy is needed to maintain secondary sex characteristics of the desired gender.

What does the transition contain and cause physically, mentally, and socially and how can we guide the patients in this process? During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a member of the UMCG Genderteam and a transgender patient.

Stupnik Simulator

Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) offers a minimally-invasive approach to lung resection that offers less pain, lower risk of infection, and shorter length of hospital stay compared to traditional thoracotomy.  Yet today less than half of lung resections utilize a VATS approach. One reason is that VATS is a complex procedure that requires a significant amount of training. This training can be expensive and infrequent, and not all surgeons have access.  To address the problem, Johnson & Johnson collaborated with Tomaž Stupnik, M.D., PhD from University Medical Centre Ljubljana in Slovenia, to develop a transportable surgical simulator and structured curriculum to help both trainees and surgeons hone their core VATS skills.   

“Training of core VATS skills outside of the operating room can help surgeons gain competency in a safe, efficient manner,” said Dr. Stupnik. 

To complement the simulator, the Johnson & Johnson Institute professional education team in Europe designed and developed a low-cost, 30-degree thoracoscopic training camera which can be powered via a USB port. This enables the simulator to be run via a standard laptop rather than with expensive hospital equipment.

Simendo Simulator

Using the Simendo simulators you will be able to train and secure the skills needed for Minimal Invasive Surgery that are frequently applied by surgeons, gynaecologists, urologists and orthopaedists. With these training solutions there is no supervisor required to make sure the required skills are obtained.

Department: Radiology, UMCG

Supervisor: Arjen van Hulzen, Msc

At every radiology department in the world radiography is the trusted workhorse of medical imaging since the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today most radiographic systems are fully digital and the technique has matured to a steady level. In this workshop basic principles of radiographic imaging are explained and examples from daily practice are demonstrated with the help of lifelike phantoms. After this workshop participants will have a basic understanding of the use of X-rays in radiography. The relation between dose and image quality and the different factors that influence image quality are explained and demonstrated.

Department: UMCG Center for Rehabilitation, Physical and Rehabilitation medicine

Speakers: Dr. G.E. van der Wal, MD PhD and Drs. M. Tepper MD

Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is an event in which the individual experience reduced or complete loss of mobility below the lesion level. Worldwide SCI has an incidence of 3.6-195.4 cases per million worldwide. In the Netherlands the incidence of traumatic SCI is about 200 cases per year, the non-traumatic SCI is much higher. Individuals with motor-complete SCI use, generally, a wheelchair to move toward a destination in their daily activities. Most of the individuals with an incomplete SCI However, sitting in a wheelchair for a longer period leads to various medical and psychological problems. Standing and gait reconstruction to prevent these problems had been a key and challenge within rehabilitation medicine. In the past decades, a few gait and walking devices have been developed to improve or optimize remaining walking abilities or to provide standing and walking abilities for (in)complete SCI individuals. In this workshop the different possibilities to improve walking or make walking able will be discussed. Especially the exoskeleton possibilities and when to use them. Several walking devices will be demonstrated. After this workshop, medical students will know when to indicate certain exoskeletons or other walking devices for individuals with loss of mobility, particularly individuals with spinal cord injury.

Department: 3D-lab / Orthopedic Surgery / Trauma Surgery

Supervisor: Peter Pijpker, Anne Meesters en Nick Assink (Technical Physicians and 3D specialists)

In the UMCG, 3D virtual surgical planning technology is used frequently for many interventions within various disciplines. The use of 3D technology assures safer, faster and more accurate surgical procedures. Within our institution the Technical Physicians of the 3D-lab are planning complex cases on a daily basis. Using 3D-printed patient specific instrumentation and implants, the virtual plan is transferred to the surgical theater with high accuracy. One of many applications is the 3D guided patient-specific corrective limb osteotomy. Corrective osteotomy surgery for bony anomalies can be very challenging since the deformation of the bone is often in three-dimensions. The use of 3D planning and printing allows to visualize the anatomy in 3D and plan the osteotomy based on the CT scan. Additionally, patient-specific instrumentation can be manufactured to guide the cutting and reposition process, leading to a more predictive result.

This workshop consists of two parts. First, the participants will learn the basics of virtual surgical planning and try to virtually plan a corrective limb osteotomy. Secondly, the workshop will continue with hands-on simulated surgery on sawbones. In this part the participants will learn to use the patient specific 3D-printed instrumentation, aiming to correct the deformity.

Marc Kaptein, MD

More information about this workshop will follow soon.

Goran Stevanovski, MD

Medicine can be a very demanding field of study, partly due to the large amount of knowledge  that a medical student will need to absorb before they graduate, with anxiety, stress, and burnout common amongst learners. When you consider the stakes that a healthcare provider will have to contend with once they practice, it becomes clear that this level of difficulty is rooted in need and is often unavoidable. However, the science out there is also clear that extreme stress and burnout is not conducive to learning and the long term retention of knowledge, both of which are paramount for healthcare professionals to provide good care. One way to avoid this is through the use of effective time management techniques that are adapted to the needs and predispositions of each individual. In this event, we will explain what time management is, why it is important for medical students, define what stress is and how it impacts learning, and share six time management techniques that are rooted in evidence which can help mitigate the unavoidable stress of medical education, with the aim of supporting participants in reaching a good work-life balance throughout their careers.

Department: Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: Jan Koetje MD PhD

In abdominal surgery bowel resections are often performed. In most cases an anastomosis is attempted. This means that the two ends of the bowel are attached to each other. In this workshop different types of anastomes are discussed and various techniques are explained. A large part of the program will consist of a hands-on workshop, in which actual intestinal anastomoses can be made by the students. After this workshop, the students will understand the different anastomoses, suturing technique and pitfalls. For this workshop, suturing experience is recommended.

H. Moshage

During this workshop you will get the chance to get in touch with researchers from the different Research Institutes of the UMCG (more information about the UMCG Research Institutes can be found under “Research in Groningen” on our website). The researchers will tell you everything about their current research projects, their departments and what it is like to do research (at the UMCG). You can choose the research (sub)topics of your own interest! Therefore you have the chance to meet the expert in the UMCG in your field of expertise.

This workshop is meant for presenting students interested in (doing) (PhD-)research at the UMCG. Everyone will be able to talk to three different researchers. You might want to exchange some contact information during that time for any future correspondence. Do not underestimate the possibilities of what these short introductions and first impressions can offer you. Please note that research in the UMCG is performed mainly by PhD/master students and covers the entire range of (bio)medical sciences. Research involving patient contact and/or performing a residency is very difficult.

You will receive detailed information about the researchers and departments participating in this workshop several weeks before the congress. Afterwards, you can get a list of all the email addresses for you in order to contact the Research Institute of your choice in the future.

Thursday June 9th

Department: Wenckebach Institute for Education and Training

Supervisor:  Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Department: Psychiatry, UMCG

Supervisor: F. D. van Es MD

Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as loss of contact with reality. Patients experiencing psychosis may report hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) or delusional beliefs (false beliefs about what is taking place or who one is). The combination of both often causes a severe disruption of perception, thinking, emotion and behaviour. Depending on its severity, a psychotic episode may thus be accompanied by unusual or bizarre behaviour, as well as difficulty with social interaction and impairment in carrying out daily life activities. As a result, patients with psychosis are caught in a hostile environment. They are therefore in need of your dedication and medical skills: how can you meet their needs? How can you avoid stigma and promote health and social recovery?

During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a psychiatrist and a patient who has suffered from psychosis.

Department: Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, UMCG Prosthetic Dentistry, UMCG

Supervisors: Prof. Henny J.A. Meijer DMD PhD, Prof. Gerry M. Raghoebar DMD PhD, Wim J.W.A. Slot DMD PhD, Charlotte Jensen DMD PhD

Losing one or more teeth in the aesthetic zone has a great impact on a person. Inserting root-form dental implants and restoring them with ceramic crowns has proven to be a reliable method to solve this problem. The dental literature shows excellent survival rates of single-tooth restorations on dental implants, varying from 96.1% to 98.9% after 7.5 years in function. Studies that address aesthetics and patient satisfaction reveal it is a very sensitive method in the eye of the professional, but that patients are generally very satisfied. This workshop comprises a lecture with the possibilities of dental implants, different treatment steps and aesthetic results. The second part of the workshop is a hands-on training in which the participant actually places a dental implant in a model, imitating the surgical part of the treatment. The workshop is supported by Straumann Netherlands.

Department:  Research Institute of Pharmacy

Supervisor: Drs. Ing. P.P.M.F.A (Patty) Mulder, Prof. E.M.J. (Sabeth) Verpoorte, PhD

Over the past couple of decades Lab-on-a-chip technologies made inroads into laboratories focusing on the development of fast chemical and bioanalytical analyses using minute volumes of sample. Micro- and nanotechnologies are used to construct interconnected microchannel networks in planar substrates, forming microfluidic devices to replace more conventional chemical vessels such as beakers, and columns to achieve ultra-small-volume (10-6 to 10-15 µL) liquid handling. Small handheld analysers are one result, suitable for medical diagnostic, agricultural, environmental, and other applications.

The last fifteen years, lab chip technologies have also found increasing application for cell biological studies, as cell microenvironments can be exquisitely engineered to mimic in vivo environments. It becomes possible to think about assembling tissue constructs or actual tissue samples in physiological configurations in specially designed lab chip systems, so-called “body-on-a-chip” or “human-on-a-chip” system. This may lead to an improved capability to study in vivo processes in vitro. Organ interactions can be revealed in these systems, giving insight not only into drug toxicity but also into more subtle regulatory pathways between organs.

This workshop will give a short glimpse into how a laboratory is actively involved in the realisation of lab chip systems for sensing/analytical chemistry and cell culture and analysis. Participants will see the fabrication of those devices and the basic principles of microfluidics. Besides that, they have an opportunity to discuss about other possible medical uses of the lab-on-a-chip technologies with researchers in the lab.

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Annemieke van Oosten PhD, Catriene Thuring VMD PhD

Microsurgical techniques have gained importance in recent years. The more delicate and sophisticated a surgical technique is, the more it requires training and education. The purpose of this workshop is to teach the students the proper way to handle their surgical instruments, how to tie a suture in the correct way and to provide an opportunity to test their hands in the fine art and skill of macro- and microscopic suturing.

Please note:

For permission to participate in the workshop it is important that you did not have contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the workshop. In this way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Department: Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: H. Sijbrand Hofker MD

Get a head start on learning a fundamental surgical skill. Our suturing workshop provides you with the training and materials to practice a variety of suturing methods (simple interrupted, simple continuous and subcutaneous) on real porcine skin. The workshop consists of two parts. The first part is a theoretical outline of several aspects of wound closure, illustrated with pictures and short animations. The second part is a practical session that features the guidance of an attending surgeon, allowing personal instruction for every participant. By the end of the workshop, students leave with basic skills necessary to practice basic suturing and achieve mastery.

Note: The practicing will be on real pig’s legs.

During this workshop you will get the opportunity to visit research laboratories in the UMCG. You will get a guided tour from a PhD student. Meanwhile you can ask this student anything you want to know about doing research in Groningen. Also, they will show the kind of research that is performed in the labs, and tell their own experiences with doing research here.

Stupnik Simulator

Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) offers a minimally-invasive approach to lung resection that studies show offers less pain, lower risk of infection, and shorter length of hospital stay compared to traditional thoracotomy.  Yet today less than half of lung resections utilize a VATS approach. One reason is that VATS is a complex procedure that requires a significant amount of training. This training can be expensive and infrequent, and not all surgeons have access. To address the problem, Johnson & Johnson collaborated with Tomaž Stupnik, M.D., PhD from University Medical Centre Ljubljana in Slovenia, to develop a transportable surgical simulator and structured curriculum to help both trainees and surgeons hone their core VATS skills.   

“Training of core VATS skills outside of the operating room can help surgeons gain competency in a safe, efficient manner,” said Dr. Stupnik. 

To complement the simulator, the Johnson & Johnson Institute professional education team in Europe designed and developed a low-cost, 30-degree thoracoscopic training camera which can be powered via a USB port. This enables the simulator to be run via a standard laptop rather than with expensive hospital equipment.

Simendo Simulator

Using the Simendo simulators you will be able to train and secure the skills needed for Minimal Invasive Surgery that are frequently applied by surgeons, gynaecologists, urologists and orthopaedists. With these training solutions there is no supervisor required to make sure the required skills are obtained.

Department: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UMCG

Supervisors: Prof. Ruud R.M. Bos DMD PhD, Dr. Baucke van Minnen 

The treatment of mandibular fractures has evolved greatly over the past 50 years. Biomechanical principles that have been developed in laboratory models are applied to clinical practice in order to allow for immediate mobilization and rehabilitation of the injured part. The goal of this workshop is to give insight in the widely accepted treatment modality of mandibular fractures: internal fixation with mini plates and screws. After a short introduction of the principles of mandibular fracture treatment, the participants will perform an osteosynthesis of mandibular fractures in a polyurethane mandible with mini plates and screws. 

Department: Pathology

Supervisor: Marius van den Heuvel, MD PhD

Despite the introduction of sophisticated techniques in modern pathology, macroscopic interpretation of resection specimens remains the cornerstone in diagnostic surgical pathology. Participants are invited to describe and interpret the macroscopy of liver tumor resection specimens. There will be emphasis on diagnosing tumors on their macroscopic features (in relation to normal, non-tumoral counterparts) and staging of tumors on macroscopy.

Department: Cardiothoracic Surgery, UMCG

Supervisors:  Wobbe Bouma MD PhD, Michiel Kuijpers MD

Heart failure is an increasing world wide problem. Until recently, heart transplantation was the only effective option to prolong survival of patients with end-stage heart failure. Nowadays it can be treated by implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). In this workshop the problem of end-stage heart failure, the relevant cardiac anatomy, and concepts of different types of left ventricular assist devices will be discussed (emergency implantation and destination therapy). The implantation technique of an internal LVAD used for destination therapy will be shown. After this workshop, medical students will understand the entity of heart failure and the concepts and problems related to LVAD therapy.

Department: 3D-lab / Orthopedic Surgery / Trauma Surgery

Supervisor: Peter Pijpker, Anne Meesters en Nick Assink (Technical Physicians and 3D specialists)

In the UMCG, 3D virtual surgical planning technology is used frequently for many interventions within various disciplines. The use of 3D technology assures safer, faster and more accurate surgical procedures. Within our institution the Technical Physicians of the 3D-lab are planning complex cases on a daily basis. Using 3D-printed patient specific instrumentation and implants, the virtual plan is transferred to the surgical theater with high accuracy.

One of many applications is the 3D guided patient-specific corrective limb osteotomy. Corrective osteotomy surgery for bony anomalies can be very challenging since the deformation of the bone is often in three-dimensions. The use of 3D planning and printing allows to visualize the anatomy in 3D and plan the osteotomy based on the CT scan. Additionally, patient-specific instrumentation can be manufactured to guide the cutting and reposition process, leading to a more predictive result.

This workshop consists of two parts. First, the participants will learn the basics of virtual surgical planning and try to virtually plan a corrective limb osteotomy. Secondly, the workshop will continue with hands-on simulated surgery on sawbones. In this part the participants will learn to use the patient specific 3D-printed instrumentation, aiming to correct the deformity.

Department: Radiology, UMCG

Supervisor: Arjen van Hulzen, Msc

At every radiology department in the world radiography is the trusted workhorse of medical imaging since the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today most radiographic systems are fully digital and the technique has matured to a steady level. In this workshop basic principles of radiographic imaging are explained and examples from daily practice are demonstrated with the help of life like phantoms. After this workshop participants will have a basic understanding of the use of X-rays in radiography. The relation between dose and image quality and the different factors that influence image quality are explained and demonstrated.

Goran Stevanovski, MD

Medicine can be a very demanding field of study, partly due to the large amount of knowledge  that a medical student will need to absorb before they graduate, with anxiety, stress, and burnout common amongst learners. When you consider the stakes that a healthcare provider will have to contend with once they practice, it becomes clear that this level of difficulty is rooted in need and is often unavoidable. However, the science out there is also clear that extreme stress and burnout is not conducive to learning and the long term retention of knowledge, both of which are paramount for healthcare professionals to provide good care. One way to avoid this is through the use of effective time management techniques that are adapted to the needs and predispositions of each individual. In this event, we will explain what time management is, why it is important for medical students, define what stress is and how it impacts learning, and share six time management techniques that are rooted in evidence which can help mitigate the unavoidable stress of medical education, with the aim of supporting participants in reaching a good work-life balance throughout their careers.

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen

Supervisor: Anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers as well, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics and emergency medicine, including pre-hospital care by helicopter. Besides clinical work, anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab with simulation training.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of vascular access and airway management. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

Friday June 10th

Department: Wenckebach Institute for Education and Training

Supervisor:  Monique Timmer, Instructor ERC / NRR CPR-Instructor

During this workshop you will be invited to engage with fellow students (3-4 people) to show us a perfect resuscitation (with AED) and continue the resuscitation for some time (5-7 minutes). The students who do not participate in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation-action (CPR) are invited to assess this resuscitation: what is going well and what could go better. If you are working as a doctor, it is necessary to take the leadership on a resuscitation team and to have the ability to coach your CPR-team. A good observation of skills is a requirement of a doctor in order to make the CPR procedure perfect. During the CPR-action it is important to push hard (5-6 cm), push fast (100-120/minute), and minimise interruption. At the end of this workshop you can exercise your CPR skills with the AED. The workshop will end with a certificate of participation “Workshop: heroes aren’t born, they are trained” given by the Wenckebach Training Institute of the UMCG. To prepare for this workshop you can find the international guidelines for CPR on the site of the ERC: www.erc.edu. Furthermore, you can find a link about an international campaign for reanimation awareness: life-saver.org.uk.

Stupnik Simulator

Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) offers a minimally-invasive approach to lung resection that studies show offers less pain, lower risk of infection, and shorter length of hospital stay compared to traditional thoracotomy.  Yet today less than half of lung resections utilize a VATS approach. One reason is that VATS is a complex procedure that requires a significant amount of training. This training can be expensive and infrequent, and not all surgeons have access. To address the problem, Johnson & Johnson collaborated with Tomaž Stupnik, M.D., PhD from University Medical Centre Ljubljana in Slovenia, to develop a transportable surgical simulator and structured curriculum to help both trainees and surgeons hone their core VATS skills.   

“Training of core VATS skills outside of the operating room can help surgeons gain competency in a safe, efficient manner,” said Dr. Stupnik. 

To complement the simulator, the Johnson & Johnson Institute professional education team in Europe designed and developed a low-cost, 30-degree thoracoscopic training camera which can be powered via a USB port. This enables the simulator to be run via a standard laptop rather than with expensive hospital equipment.

Simendo Simulator

Using the Simendo simulators you will be able to train and secure the skills needed for Minimal Invasive Surgery that are frequently applied by surgeons, gynaecologists, urologists and orthopaedists. With these training solutions there is no supervisor required to make sure the required skills are obtained.

Department: Pathology

Supervisor: Marius van den Heuvel, MD PhD

Despite the introduction of sophisticated techniques in modern pathology, macroscopic interpretation of resection specimens remains the cornerstone in diagnostic surgical pathology. Participants are invited to describe and interpret the macroscopy of liver tumor resection specimens. There will be emphasis on diagnosing tumors on their macroscopic features (in relation to normal, non-tumoral counterparts) and staging of tumors on macroscopy.

Department: Cardiothoracic Surgery, UMCG

Supervisors: W. Bouma MD PhD, Y. Blaauw MD PhD

Atrial fibrillation is an increasing world-wide problem and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In this workshop the basic anatomy of the heart and its relationship with the etiology and pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation will be discussed. A basic understanding of cardiac anatomy is essential in understanding atrial fibrillation and the different surgical treatment modalities. The different surgical treatment modalities for atrial fibrillation will be explained and shown during this workshop. Advantages and disadvantages of these techniques will be discussed. After this workshop, medical students will understand the basics of atrial fibrillation and its surgical treatment.   

Department: Research Support Facility – Central Animal Facility

Supervisors: Catriene Thuring VMD PhD and Annemieke van Oosten PhD

Many major findings in the field of human medicine have been established following animal experiments. To date, animal experimentation is still a very important way to gain data and knowledge mandatory to develop new procedures in modern human medicine. Within the UMCG all animal experimental work is organised in the Central Animal Facility. The workshop consists of a guided tour in this facility. During the tour the current status of laboratory animal experimentation within the UMCG will be presented to you.

Please note:

In order to participate in the tour it is important that you did not have contact with rodents or rabbits in the 24 hours prior to the tour. This way we want to prevent unwanted transmission of pathogenic micro-organisms to our laboratory animals.

Department: Psychiatry, UMCG

Supervisor: F. D. van Es MD

Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as loss of contact with reality. Patients experiencing psychosis may report hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there) or delusional beliefs (false beliefs about what is taking place or who one is). The combination of both often causes a severe disruption of perception, thinking, emotion and behaviour. Depending on its severity, a psychotic episode may thus be accompanied by unusual or bizarre behaviour, as well as difficulty with social interaction and impairment in carrying out daily life activities. As a result, patients with psychosis are caught in a hostile environment. They are therefore in need of your dedication and medical skills: how can you meet their needs? How can you avoid stigma and promote health and social recovery?

During this workshop you will be able to ask questions to a psychiatrist and a patient who has suffered from psychosis.

Department:  Research Institute of Pharmacy

Supervisor: Drs. Ing. P.P.M.F.A (Patty) Mulder, Prof. E.M.J. (Sabeth) Verpoorte, PhD

Over the past couple of decades Lab-on-a-chip technologies made inroads into laboratories focusing on the development of fast chemical and bioanalytical analyses using minute volumes of sample. Micro- and nanotechnologies are used to construct interconnected microchannel networks in planar substrates, forming microfluidic devices to replace more conventional chemical vessels such as beakers, and columns to achieve ultra-small-volume (10-6 to 10-15 µL) liquid handling. Small handheld analysers are one result, suitable for medical diagnostic, agricultural, environmental, and other applications.

The last fifteen years, lab chip technologies have also found increasing application for cell biological studies, as cell microenvironments can be exquisitely engineered to mimic in vivo environments. It becomes possible to think about assembling tissue constructs or actual tissue samples in physiological configurations in specially designed lab chip systems, so-called “body-on-a-chip” or “human-on-a-chip” system. This may lead to an improved capability to study in vivo processes in vitro. Organ interactions can be revealed in these systems, giving insight not only into drug toxicity but also into more subtle regulatory pathways between organs.

This workshop will give a short glimpse into how a laboratory is actively involved in the realisation of lab chip systems for sensing/analytical chemistry and cell culture and analysis. Participants will see the fabrication of those devices and the basic principles of microfluidics. Besides that, they have an opportunity to discuss about other possible medical uses of the lab-on-a-chip technologies with researchers in the lab.

Department: Surgery, UMCG

Supervisor: H. Sijbrand Hofker MD

Get a head start on learning a fundamental surgical skill. Our suturing workshop provides you with the training and materials to practice a variety of suturing methods (simple interrupted, simple continuous and subcutaneous) on real porcine skin. The workshop consists of two parts. The first part is a theoretical outline of several aspects of wound closure, illustrated with pictures and short animations. The second part is a practical session that features the guidance of an attending surgeon, allowing personal instruction for every participant. By the end of the workshop, students leave with basic skills necessary to practice basic suturing and achieve mastery.

Note: The practicing will be on real pig’s legs.

epartment: Otorhinolaryngology, UMCG

Supervisor:  A. (Bert) Maat MSc

72% of healthy human ears are emitting acoustic energy just below the hearing threshold. This phenomenon is called Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emission (SOAE). The origin of this acoustic signal lies within the cochlea. Outer hair cells (OHC’s) in the cochlea are believed to play a key role in generation of Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE’s). OAE’s have been found in other mammals, but in non-mammals as well, such as lizards, frogs, and birds, sharing this fundamental biophysical mechanism. What can we learn from this fundamental mechanism, do they interact with incoming sounds, why do they exist, and can we make use of OAE’s in diagnostics? But the bigger question is: do you have SOAE’s? In this workshop you will find out.

Department: Department of Critical Care, UMCG

Supervisors: A. (Annalies) de Bont-Prins and M. (Marije) Smit MD

Implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the ICU to provide care in often life-threatening situations, focused attention on the relevance of leadership behaviour. Effective, coordinated, and safe patient care challenge even the most experienced ICU teams daily. Leadership behaviour is defined as the process of influencing others to understand and agree about what needs to be done and how to do it, and facilitating individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared objectives. Simulation training is useful for teaching team-based crisis management skills and is now considered essential in developing and maintaining competencies for ICU workers.

In our high fidelity simulation center, participants of the workshop will become familiar with some stepwise elements of the treatment, such as resuscitation and airway management of critically ill patients. The non-technical skills such as leadership, communication, and cooperation are also emphasised. The experiences may contribute to the development of knowledge and skills in decision-making and teamwork during the treatment of critically ill patients.

Department: Radiology, UMCG

Supervisor: Arjen van Hulzen, Msc

At every radiology department in the world radiography is the trusted workhorse of medical imaging since the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today most radiographic systems are fully digital and the technique has matured to a steady level. In this workshop basic principles of radiographic imaging are explained and examples from daily practice are demonstrated with the help of life like phantoms. After this workshop participants will have a basic understanding of the use of X-rays in radiography. The relation between dose and image quality and the different factors that influence image quality are explained and demonstrated.

Goran Stevanovski, MD

Medicine can be a very demanding field of study, partly due to the large amount of knowledge  that a medical student will need to absorb before they graduate, with anxiety, stress, and burnout common amongst learners. When you consider the stakes that a healthcare provider will have to contend with once they practice, it becomes clear that this level of difficulty is rooted in need and is often unavoidable. However, the science out there is also clear that extreme stress and burnout is not conducive to learning and the long term retention of knowledge, both of which are paramount for healthcare professionals to provide good care. One way to avoid this is through the use of effective time management techniques that are adapted to the needs and predispositions of each individual. In this event, we will explain what time management is, why it is important for medical students, define what stress is and how it impacts learning, and share six time management techniques that are rooted in evidence which can help mitigate the unavoidable stress of medical education, with the aim of supporting participants in reaching a good work-life balance throughout their careers.

Lucas Kuipers

Healthcare is responsible for approximately seven percent of Dutch carbon emissions. As part of the Green Deal, stakeholders from every part of the Dutch healthcare system have agreed to reduce the carbon footprint with 49 percent. (Academic) hospitals can make a major impact in this movement. Gupta strategists helps clients throughout the healthcare system with solving these types of strategic challenges. In this workshop we will give you a sneakpeak into strategy consulting in healthcare by working on a case on sustainable healthcare. You will be trained in structuring and solving complex problems and we will inform you about our work and the impact that we make for our clients.

H. Moshage

During this workshop you will get the chance to get in touch with researchers from the different Research Institutes of the UMCG (more information about the UMCG Research Institutes can be found under “Research in Groningen” on our website). The researchers will tell you everything about their current research projects, their departments and what it is like to do research (at the UMCG). You can choose the research (sub)topics of your own interest! Therefore you have the chance to meet the expert in the UMCG in your field of expertise.

This workshop is meant for presenting students interested in (doing) (PhD-)research at the UMCG. Everyone will be able to talk to three different researchers. You might want to exchange some contact information during that time for any future correspondence. Do not underestimate the possibilities of what these short introductions and first impressions can offer you. Please note that research in the UMCG is performed mainly by PhD/master students and covers the entire range of (bio)medical sciences. Research involving patient contact and/or performing a residency is very difficult.

You will receive detailed information about the researchers and departments participating in this workshop several weeks before the congress. Afterwards, you can get a list of all the email addresses for you in order to contact the Research Institute of your choice in the future.

George Volckmann

In this hands-on workshop, the various treatment possibilities for fractures wil be elaborated. The biomechanical aspects of the different fixation methods will be highlighted. Moreover, you will be able to fixate implants on several kinds of fractures for the proximal femur, tibia and proximal humerus. The placement of the implants will be effectuated with medical drills, saws and operation sets.

Department: Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen

Supervisor: Anaesthesiology residents

Anaesthesiologists are perioperative medical specialists who provide medical care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures. Airway management, intraoperative life support, and pain control are essential skills. Besides their work in the perioperative field as physicians and nowadays often as managers as well, anaesthesiologists are involved in Intensive Care Units, Postoperative Anaesthesia Care Units, Pain Clinics and emergency medicine, including pre-hospital care by helicopter. Besides clinical work, anaesthesiologists are involved in teaching and research. In the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) residents and staff members are trained in an ultramodern Skills Lab with simulation training.

This anaesthesiology workshop provides a basic approach to patient care. Participants will deal with various aspects of vascular access and airway management. You will be assisted by trained anaesthesiologists to keep the patient safe and sound.

Department: Radiation Oncology

Supervisors: Peter van Ooijen PhD (DASH), Naila Loudini (Aletta Solutions) and Vlad Iftime (Aletta Solutions)

We live in a world where more and more diseases are emerging. Clinical trials play a key role in getting medication to patients who need it in a timely manner. An important part of clinical trials is data collection. The current standard for data capture are clinical surveys that patients are required to fill out. However, a big challenge that clinical trials face is patient dropout. Ultimately, patients don’t feel engaged. More interactive solutions combining data capture and patient engagement are needed, and AI could be the solution for this. The first part of this workshop will introduce Aletta Solutions, and our concept of a conversational chatbot. The second part of the workshop will be a hands-on experience with different data collection technologies. Together we will discuss the experience with these methods, and further discuss the challenges of AI to collect and process data in healthcare. For example, are chatbot conversations a standardized way to collect patient data? This workshop is supported by DASH, and we will inform you about upcoming events in AI and healthcare.